The Ballad of the Rebel™ : The Left’s Empty Rebellion

You all are probably all familiar with “The Resistance” by now. It was the loosely defined term referring to those in opposition to the Trump Presidency. The name implies calls to image a rag-tag band of true believers righteously battling an oppressive system, but I’m here to demonstrate how ironic that name, and idea, is for the left. They are anything but rebels. In fact, they’re more the General Infantry of the establishment than anything else. Those on the left that called themselves the “Resistance” ,or believed themselves to be rebels to some degree under Trump, painted themselves regularly as a political movement that the establishment didn’t want to succeed. But in reality, their numerous big-name backers and the countless corporations that have come out in support of the left’s causes demonstrate the massive grip the left has on the institutions of society, destroying this rebel complex.

During the Trump Presidency, a lot of rhetoric coming from the left focused on how Trump was an oppressive megalomaniac, in essence. They made him out to be the undisputed, tyrannical, and absolute monarch of an all-encompassing American state. I am exaggerating somewhat, but it was certainly made out to seem that Trump and the state he commanded was the sole center of power in the US, and an equally monolithic resistance movement would form to combat the supposed tyrant. Thus, with his election, came the formation of “The Resistance.”

Vague by design, the name was meant to corral as many people as possible that were vaguely anti-trump into the appearance of some sort of mass rebellion movement. It was meant to draw a clear line between the oppressors and the oppressed, a theme common in postmodern leftism, borne in principle from the writings of Marx, albeit with different constituent elements replacing the proletariat and the bourgeoisie.

Modern sensibilities often romanticize the rebel. No doubt it is a downstream byproduct of the hippie movement, since those same people who indulged in the culture are now in power. The rebel is seen by the wider population as a universal aspiration. Both the left and the right utilize rebel images, fighting differently defined oppressive systems. The difference lies in whether or not those conceptions of oppressive apparatuses are valid. One is not, and I am going to explain why.

Let us first take explore where power in the United States truly originates. This rebel complex demonstrated by the left relies on a very archaic interpretation of the center of power, that being that it is primarily expressed through the state. Some do claim that corporate interests do influence the wider society, but the left focuses primarily on the backing of the state by those big money interests. They rarely claim that corporations make any sort of illiberal social impact on the modern culture of the United States, but the truth is corporations do exactly the opposite. They push an explicitly leftist agenda.

This brings us back to our discussion of where the center of power lies in America. No leftist would claim that big money does not have a heavy hand in politics, but they would dispute which team they are batting for, so to speak. The center of power in America, and in most western democracies, lies in money and the political expression of money. Oswald Spengler pointed this out in the 1920s in his seminal work The Decline of the West, and its words have never been more prophetic. Corporations, NGOs, and other big-money organizations not only express their power through the state via large donations but also exact their will directly into the social fabric of the nation.

Take Black Lives Matter, for example. Amazon, Microsoft, and countless other corporations donated exorbitant sums of money to the organization, an explicitly leftist cause by the organization’s own admission. The Open Society Foundation, a venture by billionaire George Soros, who has a long history of supporting the left’s causes, had a dramatic increase in spending in the fiscal year 2020. BLM in total raised an astronomical 90 million dollars in 2020 alone. Virtually all major corporations in America have expressed support for Black Lives Matter. This is not insignificant. These voices hold weight, and with a monstrous media machine to boot, their message is broadcast into the homes of every American.

Social Media also directly controls the conversation which, again, have almost unanimously expressed support for the left’s causes. By the result of big money alone, the people were led to believe that not supporting BLM is tantamount to heresy in the eyes of the ever-ambiguous conception of modern “morality.” You are not a good person if you don’t support BLM. You are not an ally. You are not worth anyone’s time or sympathy. You are the outcast.

 Through this alone, we can see that this rebel complex the modern left has is quite silly. Corporate America, on the whole, has championed leftist causes constantly, and it shows no signs of stopping. The interesting part is that leftists don’t even try to think about this, lest cognitive dissonance shut down their worldview. In reality, those with an ear to the ground of leftist politics know that they don’t mind the big-money support even if it conflicts with their principles.

Who wouldn’t want a virtually ubiquitous corporate apparatus of commerce, media, and discourse to bat for their team? I know as a conservative, I’d want one.

This rebel complex serves a very important purpose in giving the left its power on the ground and elsewhere. Firstly, as Americans and, by necessity, children of the enlightenment and their ideas about what liberty is and how it is preserved, people are naturally driven to rebellious causes because of our predispositions. They’re romantic. They call upon in some superficial way the good fight of our ancestors. Rebellion is the purest manifestation of the individual, to be but one unique person with ideas in hand wielded as weapons against all that oppresses and controls. It’s hard in America to debate on the side of the supposed “oppressor” because doing so would be a betrayal of those cherished principles of our nation’s birth. This rebel complex of the left provides fearsome durability against criticism from other groups and has contributed to its backing from larger interests that want to be “on the right side of history,” so it has been said.

The power of these simplistic implications that come with being a “rebel” is nothing to scoff at. Any opposition to the movement that brands itself as a rebellion would naturally fall on the side of the oppressor by necessity, making debate and any meaningful opposition seem like tyranny.

Controlling this window of what a “rebel” is at large is absolutely essential in American politics. We can’t shake that. We were founded on rebellion and the enlightenment’s intellectual rebellion from the old order in Europe. Right now, the left firmly controls the framework of what a rebel is, ironically with the help of massive money interests. It is powerful and threatens the existence of the United States as we know it.

So long as this rebel complex is used as a bludgeon by the hand of international elites and their foot soldiers who buy into the myth, the United States lies within a massive identity crisis. The left’s rebel myth is a farce at its core, and all it takes to see it is to look at who pulls strings and where the money flows.

Follow the money, and it leads right into the left’s hands, whether they like it or not. They are not rebels. They are the foot soldiers of a new conception of America backed by the biggest money interests in the world.

And we, as patriots, must fight to preserve our nation from not annihilation but replacement at its very core; Replacement of everything we love with the whims of the left. They will do all this while flying the banner of empty rebellion

Published by WallaceHWhite

19 American University '24 Political Science and Economics, BS Conservative patriot Quis Ut Deus?

One thought on “The Ballad of the Rebel™ : The Left’s Empty Rebellion

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: